Feline Emergency :: Poisons and Toxins :: Household Hazards
 

The following are classes of household dangers that pose a potential toxicity to your pet if ingested, swallowed, or was in contact with. Immediate emergency veterinary attention is warranted at any time you feel your kitty might have come into contact with a toxin of any type. Never try to treat your kitty on your own, as you could cause further damage. Always call your vet or an emergency vet if you are at any time uncertain about a toxin's adverse effects, or anytime you feel your kitty has come into contact with a toxic substance.
 
 

Over-the-Counter Drugs and Medications:

Aspirin (contains salicylates)
Acetaminophen (Tylenol, Excedrin)
Ibuprofen (NSAIDS, Advil, Motrin, Nurofen, Nuprin)
Naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naxen)
Ketoprofen (Orudis-KT, Ketofen)
Other Pain Relievers
NSAIDS
Antihistamines
Pseudoephedrine (Cold, Allergy and Sinus Medications)
Decongestants
Sleeping Pills
Diet Pills
Heart Medications
Vitamins
Wintergreen
Salicylates (Aspirin, Pepto-Bismal)
Bismuth Subsalicylate (Kaopectate, new formula)
Methyl Salicylate

Signs of Toxicity:

Vomiting, depression, anorexia, diarrhea, gastric hemorrhage, anemia, hyperthermia, hyperventilation, incoordination, hypersensitivity, difficulty breathing, facial and paw edema, bloody urine, generalized weakness, coma, thrombocytopenia, loss of balance and death

Household Cleaners and Chemicals:

Bleach
Boric Acid
Pine Oils, cleaners
Toilet bowl cleaners
Dishwashing detergents
Drain cleaners
Commercial solvents
Phenol

Signs of Toxicity:

Vomiting, depression, CNS depression, anorexia, diarrhea, muscle weakness, ataxia, seizures, hyperactivity, salivation, death

Lead and Chemicals:

Cosmetics
Essential oils
Rubber products
Batteries
Soaps
Aromatherapy products
Printing ink
Mercuric oxide
Lithium
Cadmium
Zinc
Fireworks
Matches
Arsenic
Strychnine
Metaldehyde
Snail bait
Slug and Snail bait
Ant Poisons
Weed killers
Insecticides
Zinc pennies
Linoleum
Commercial paints
Batteries
Fertilizer

Signs of Toxicity:

Gastrointestinal signs, vomiting, abdominal pain, anorexia, diarrhea, CNS stimulation or depression, weight loss, ataxia, lethargy, megaesophagus, tremors or convulsions, hysteria, blindness, coma, death

Rodenticides:

Warfarin
Coumateryl
Brodifacoum
Cholecalciferol
Sodium flouroacetate
Strychnine
Phosphorus
Zinc Phosphide
Rat poisons
Mole poisons
Roach poisons

Signs of Toxicity:

Weakness, depression, coughing, ataxia, vomiting, constipation, hypertension, confusion and disorientation, aimless wandering, vocalization, salivation, labored breathing, staggering, pallor, dyspnea, hematomas, seizures, convulsions, respiratory failure, renal failure, cardiac failure, sudden death

Insecticides:

Amitraz (tick collar)
Pyrethrins
Pyrethyoids
Organophosphates
Carmates
Flea collars
Snail and Slug bait
Borates
Citrus oils
Insect repellents
Organochlorine
Rotenine

Signs of Toxicity:

Depression, muscle tremors, dypsnea, anorexia, vomiting, CNS depression, seizures, diarrhea, excessive salivation, bronchial secretions, respiratory distress or paralysis, hyperactivity, sudden death

Herbicides, Lawn & Garden & Garage Hazards:

Weedkillers
Metaldehyde
Chlorophenoxy
Dipyridyl
Paraquat
Diquat
Fertilizers
Antifreeze (ethylene glycol)
Petroleum products
Gasoline
Kerosene
Turpentine
Commercial solvents
Corrosives

Signs of Toxicity:

Gastrointestinal and neurological signs, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, depression, respiratory distress, weakness, rapid respiratory rate, tachycardia, salivation, tremors or seizures, hyperthermia, respiratory failure, sudden death


AT A GLANCE: Foods and chemicals that are potentially toxic to pets:

Foods:

Alcoholic beverages
Apple Seeds
Apricot pits
Avocados
Beans
Beets
Brussel Sprouts
Cherry pits
Chives
Chocolate (all types)
Coffee (all types)
Eggs (raw)
Garlic
Garlic powder or salt
Grapes
Hops (used in home brewing)
Leeks
Macadamia nuts
Moldy foods
Mushrooms and mushroom plants
Mustard seeds
Onions
Onion powder or salt
Peach pits
Potato leaves and stems
Raw meats
Rhubarb
Rhubarb leaves
Salt
Spinach
Tea (caffeine)
Tomato leaves and stems
Walnuts
Xylitol (artificial sweetener, found in "sugar-free" products)
Yeast dough

Chemicals:

Acetaminophen
Ammonia
Aromatherapy products
Aspirin
Antifreeze
Bar soaps and bath oils
Bleach
Boric acid
Brake Fluid
Caulking compounds
Coal and wood derivatives
Carbon monoxide
Carburetor cleaner
Citrus oils (and pennyroyal)
Cleaning Fluids
Corn removers
Deodorants
Deodorizers
Detergents
Diet pills
Disinfectants
Drain cleaners
Dyes
Essential oils
Eye makeup
Fabric softeners
Fungicides
Furniture polish
Gasoline
Hair coloring
Herbicides
Iodoform
Insecticides
Kerosene
Laxatives
Lead
Liquor
Liniments
Lubricants
Lye
Matches
Metal
Polish
Mineral spirits
Mothballs
Nail polish and remover
Oil paints
Ointments
Paints and removers
Perfumes
Pine oil and derivatives
Phenol
Photo developing solution
Rat poison
Rubbing alcohol
Shoe polish
Sleeping pills
Slug/snail bait
Soaps
Suntan lotion
Tar
Turpentine
Window cleaners
Wood preservatives

CatHelp-Online wishes to remind you that anytime you suspect your kitty may have ingested or come into contact with any toxic substance, do not hesitate, see your vet or an emergency vet ASAP. Treatments vary according to the particular toxin, so time is of the essense. Again, never attempt to treat your kitty on your own, only your vet can effectively evaluate your kitty's condition and proceed with appropriate treatment. We hope that our database has helped inform you of potential toxins and hope that you will make every effort in keeping your home and kitty's environment as safe as possible. Please keep your vet's number by your phone at all times!

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National Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435
$50 Fee (V, MC, DC, AmEx) : 24 hrs / 7 days a week

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